Cervical cancer begins with abnormal changes in the cervical tissue. The risk of developing these abnormal changes is associated with infection with human papilloma virus (HPV). In addition, early sexual contact, multiple sexual partners, and taking oral contraceptives increase the risk of cervical cancer because they lead to greater exposure to HPV.

Forms of HPV, a virus whose different types cause skin warts, genital warts, and other abnormal skin disorders, have been shown to lead to many of the changes in cervical cells that may eventually lead to cancer. Certain types of HPV have also been linked to cancers involving the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, tongue, and tonsils. Genetic material that comes from certain forms of HPV (high-risk subtypes) has been found in cervical tissues that show cancerous or precancerous changes.

In addition, women who have been diagnosed with HPV are more likely to develop a cervical cancer. Girls who begin sexual activity before age 16 or within a year of starting their menstrual periods are at high risk of developing cervical cancer.

Cigarette smoking is another risk factor for the development of cervical cancer. The chemicals in cigarette smoke interact with the cells of the cervix, causing precancerous changes that may over time progress to cancer. The risk of cervical cancer in cigarette smokers is two to five times that of the general population.

Oral contraceptives (“the pill”), especially if taken longer than five years, may increase the risk for cervical cancer because they reduce the use of condoms.

Source WebMD

Categoryfeatured-news, News
  1. March 17, 2019

    I am no longer positive where you’re getting your information, but great topic. I must spend a while learning much more or figuring out more. Thank you for wonderful info I used to be in search of this information for my mission.

Write a comment:

*

Your email address will not be published.